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The boxing coach who was one of the first to help victims of the attack on Westminster is an ex Fusilier.  You can read his account below, as reported in the Times on 24 March 2017.  The Col of the Regt, who once served with Tony,  expressed his and the Regiment’s pride at Tony’s selfless support.


Tony Davis, who spent 22 years in the army, was leaving a press conference with a group of British boxers.

“I didn’t realise there was a crash at the time,” he said. “I thought it was a student demonstration, there were people running, coming round towards the gate.

All of a sudden I saw a large chap brandishing two knives come through the gates and start attacking the policeman. At that point instinct kicked in, I leapt over the fence because that guy needed assistance.

The police were holding their ground and that is when poor Keith got attacked. You start moving back with adrenaline pumping in. At this point the assailant was coming towards us and I recall out of the corner of my eye one of the marksmen coming out and putting three rounds in him.”

Mr Davis, 42, from Darlington, Co Durham, is a GB Boxing performance coach. Four of his fighters, who had also attended the event celebrating the team’s community scheme and witnessed the attack on PC Palmer, won bouts last night. They were told to run away but have praised Mr Davis for staying to help.

“Everything happened so quick but my natural instinct was to get over there and give some assistance if need be,” Mr Davis, a former staff sergeant, said. “I’m not that specially trained in first aid but I know the basics and can put someone at ease. Initially when he fell to the ground I tried to have a look at him and put him in the recovery position and check his pulse.

“He had a weak pulse, he was bleeding profusely. He had an initial head wound which didn’t look too bad although it was bleeding. I know a lot of police were screaming, ‘He’s been stabbed in the head.’ But he had another wound in his arm and another one which I believe was probably the fatal one under his rib cage.

“I put my raincoat underneath to try to stem the blood.”